Calathea Orbifolia: The Worthy Calathea


Welcome back, Plant Lovers and Friends. Thank you so much for following along on my plant process and the plant care I come to find out that works! Plants are a beautiful example of life and learning what works and what does not. Every situation does not have the same solutions, and humans do not have the same care tips as well. I know I love plant care so much because it opens your mind to think differently and challenges you to learn. Additionally, failing is ABSOULTUELY part of the process. I do not know one plant parent who has not killed a couple of plants in their lifetime, and guess what? That is O-K-A-Y. Failure is part of life, so making mistakes and learning from them is more important because that is what grows these indoor jungles. Do not be scared of the process. Love it. Cherish it. Learn from it.





It may seem a little weird that I have brought up failure for Calathea Orbifolia, but I have failed on this plant twice, and it did not stop me from trying again! I now have three thriving babies. Yes, three. They are not giant yet, but they are ALIVE! (That is all that matters right?) Learning from my mistakes previously taught me how to be better now. First, they are spoiled brats. They want distilled water, a LOT of humidity, and good sunlight but not too much. Now, what you are really come for! How to take care of your Calathea Orbifolia, and no I do not have pictures of my dying Orbifolia like I did Monestra. (Sorry, I will do better for you plant lover to see my flaws too.)

***Now for the plant tip you have been waiting on (;





PLANT CARE FOR CALATHEA ORBIFOLIA:


Temperature: 65-75 Degrees Fahrenheit (18-24 Degrees Celcius)


-I would keep their temperature around 72-74 Degrees Fahrenheit. I am currently in Denver, Colorado, and I keep my Orbifolia outside in the shade which the temperature is 80ish Degrees Fahrenheit. (It's thriving though.)


***Humidy gauger also tells the temperature


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Soil: Well-drained. I created a mixture of potting soil, bark, charcoal, perlite, and

worm casting. This just creates nutritious soil. If you like to water your plants a lot, I suggest a little more bark and perlite, but if you are the type to forget to water, I would have more soil and add pea moss to hold moisture. Calathea Orbifolia does not like to be dried out, but moist. Therefore, I recommend having more pea moss than the bark and perlitee.

*** my opinion is that soil is mostly preference, but giving the soil nutrients is the most important part. Yes, all plants live in different soil types like cactus versus Calathes. I could be completely wrong, and please let me know your opinions down in the comment sections, but I am speaking based on my experience.


Water: OHMYGOODNESS. Never did I thought water matter so much. This plant is absolute royality. She needs that room temp filter/distill water. She does not want any minerals in her water, so if you do not want crispy leaves, you better give her what see deserves !!


Humidity: THIS PLANT LOVES ITS HUMMIDIY (~60/80%). I kept my Calathea Orbifolia in roughly 68-72% of humidity. I do put this beauty in the Georgia humidity for the summer, and they love it.


This plant is non-toxic to animals. Still do not let your beautiful plant be eat!


Propagation: This plant does not have the luxury of just getting a clipping. You will have to let this beauty grow full and lushes, and once you decide it time to propagate, you will have to do division propagation. Division propagation is when you repot a plant, but you break up the plant based on blubs. I have never tried this with a Calathea Orbifolia, but I did try it with my Network Calatea. I have a 3 out of 5 success, so do not be fearful of trying new propagation techniques!

*** if you need a motivation speech on failure, please read the top half of this blog <3


This plant is "easy"-going, and a blast to have in the home. Sometimes it takes experience to learn what works best within your home, so do not be afraid to try out a new plant!



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